Home Page

Want to Write for TV in the Philippines?

Want to Write for TV in the Philippines?

Demand is up.  Call it reverse outsourcing. You won’t get rich.  Top writers earn just $1,200 US a week or about 52,000 Philippine pesos. On the bright side, you probably have better training than many of the upcoming writers there.  The one hitch in the git-along might be language. There are two official languages in the Philippines: English and Filipino (or Tagalog).   If they’re accepting submissions in English…hmmm…could be good practice. Let us know if you decide to try this. We’d love to hear about your experience. Here’s the article.  Good luck! ...

read more...

The Top 5 Pitch Fests

The Top 5 Pitch Fests

The other day we talked about how to prepare for pitch fests.  Today, we’ve got a list of events you can attend both in person and online to collect reads for your script. There are three basic types of pitch fests: 1)      In Person Meetings.  You travel to a specific destination and meet face-to-face with studio executives, agents, and/or readers.  These are usually weekend events lasting up to three days.  They’re also often tightly structured for time. 2)      Online Virtual Meeting.   Think Skype®.  All you need is the web camera built into your laptop and you can have a virtual meeting with a potential reader.  Fade In Magazine sponsors an event that follows the...

read more...

Tips for Getting Your Script Read at a Pitch Fest

Tips for Getting Your Script Read at a Pitch Fest

It’s Pitch Fest season again.  That finger-biting, stomach-twisting time of year when thousands of screenwriters flood bland hotel ballrooms hoping to connect with the perfect reader. Like it or not, Hollywood runs on meetings.  And while the circus-like, speed dating atmosphere of most pitch fests doesn’t feel like a serious meeting, it is.  It’s your chance to be viewed as a professional.  Do it right and your five minutes of calm, focused, targeted and delightful presentation could end in a request for a read.  Do it wrong and you not only run the risk of being marked as amateur, but you’ll spend part of the next pitch meeting trying to recover your confidence. Here are a few...

read more...

Let’s Get Physical: How to Make Your Scenes Fresher and Richer using the Physical World (Part 4 of 4)

Let’s Get Physical:  How to Make Your Scenes Fresher and Richer using the Physical World (Part 4 of 4)

Fighting to Preserve Rush Hour — MOVIECLIPS.com     Jackie Chan is a master of playing with the physical world.  He reportedly keeps notebooks full of ideas to help plan sequences like the one above from Rush Hour. Granted, your script may not call for elaborately choreographed fight sequences, but that shouldn’t prevent you from really exploring the physical world of your story. If you read the previous posts and did your homework, you know three things: 1)      How to keep things real in a physical space 2)      How to let the actors show their chops using just their bodies 3)      How to use an object to create subtext and significance in a scene Now, i...

read more...

Let’s Get Physical: How to Make Your Scenes Fresher and Richer using the Physical World (Part 3 of 4)

Let’s Get Physical:  How to Make Your Scenes Fresher and Richer using the Physical World (Part 3 of 4)

We’ve talked about using the given circumstances and letting actors work with their bodies to wring more out of a scene physically, but what about objects?   Here’s the next question to ask: Is there an object that can inject more meaning into this scene? Physical objects are loaded with associations. Sometimes just placing the right object within sight can add extra texture to a scene. In other cases, an object can become the focal point to sharpen and clarify the scene. A writer brought us a scene in which a flight line worker at a military airport is forced to deny the existence of a top-secret airplane he works on every day. A special agent lectures the worker on the dire consequen...

read more...

Let’s Get Physical: How to Make Your Scenes Fresher and Richer using the Physical World (Part 2 of 4)

Let’s Get Physical:  How to Make Your Scenes Fresher and Richer using the Physical World (Part 2 of 4)

Writers like to write words.  Actors like to say words, but they also like to use their bodies. They’re sensual beings.  They train for years to use their faces, voice, and body to convey subtle emotions.  Experts say as much as 93% of human communication is non-verbal.  Yet, as writers, it’s far too easy to  get caught up trying to turn out clever dialogue when often a single look can completely eliminate the need for words. Avoid that trap.  Take a look at your scene and ask yourself: What can I show so that I don’t have to tell? There’s a classic scene mentioned in our Special Report, between two brothers at a frat party. The younger brother, Joe, is drunk and throwing up in...

read more...

Let’s Get Physical: How to Make Your Scenes Fresher and Richer using the Physical World Part (1 of 4)

Let’s Get Physical:  How to Make Your Scenes Fresher and Richer using the Physical World Part (1 of 4)

Company Party Big — MOVIECLIPS.com     One of the many, many advantages of using actors to work scripts is that they take up space. They’re real flesh and bone beings who need things to hold or to sit on. They react to the physical world in unexpected ways.  They stumble, get cold, cry, and play with things they shouldn’t. Think of the great limo ride scene in Big.  Tom Hanks’ character, Josh, can’t resist touching everything.  His erratic physical actions are a wonderful counterpoint to Susan’s faux attempt at vulnerability.   In the office party scene clip above, far more is revealed about Josh through his interactions with the food than you’d get from des...

read more...

The Lorax: Interviews with the Screenwriters

The Lorax: Interviews with the Screenwriters

Trailer #1 The Lorax — MOVIECLIPS.com     What does it take to write a record setting animation script?  One capable of raking in over $70 million in its first weekend? Apparently three years of commitment and rewriting.  And a touch of insanity. Any professional screenwriter will tell you every project is different.  Each has its own pitfalls.  Scripts can languish for years and suddenly get resurrected by a producer with passion.  Likewise, a screenplay can be re-written in good faith until it’s unrecognizable — and still go unproduced. But, for some, the process of writing for animation is a special kind of torture.  Because the animators are painstakingly...

read more...

Are Screenwriters Lazy?

Are Screenwriters Lazy?

In an article attacking the new flick, This Means War, the author also takes aim at screenwriters.  His or her point is that screenwriters are, by nature, cinephiles.   This is all well and good, according to the author, until writers start stuffing character dialogue full of movie references.  Then it’s just lazy. What do you think?  Have we become too “inside baseball”?  Are movies too self-referential? I certainly agree with the author’s point that pop culture reigns among, well…pop culture.  The point of Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, et al is to share our interests.  Movies, of course, are a huge part of the conversation whether you’re cinephile or not. So, are screen...

read more...

Will the Next Spec Script You Write be for China?

Will the Next Spec Script You Write be for China?

Technically, every script you write is also for China and the international markets.  According to the Motion Picture Association of America, 67 percent of box office revenue now comes from outside the United States.  There’s even a trend to release some kinds of movies to the international market before hitting U.S. screens.  By the time Thor opened in North America theaters last May, the film had already made more than $130 million abroad. Last year the Chinese box office crossed the $2 billion mark.   The country is reportedly adding four screens a day and headed toward 12% annual growth. No wonder DreamWorks wants a piece of the action.  Today, DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc. anno...

read more...
Page 3 of 3« Prev123

.

I still think your workshop...was one of the greatest things to happen to my writing; it had me seeing the written word in ways that opened up new and creative horizons. Thanks.

Jill Hoven
Writer

It was very well structured. The improvisation was magical. The actors really worked with character motivations and goals and took them to another level.

JoAnne Edwards
Writer

All four performers were terrific and I loved everyone's instincts, knowledge and professionalism. I felt I learned a lot, not just about how to improve my scene but how to make my screenplay better over all.

Karen Walton-Rolls
Writer

A storyboard of the scene was perhaps the most surprising and useful tool! It was absolutely inspiring!

Olesia Shewchuk
Writer

Discover the Secrets to Great Pitching

Tweet Geof and Troy!
This website is protected by law: Copyright 2011, www.Sceneplay.net